PENNDOT: Bridge Replacement Project to Begin in 2015; 7 County Bridges on List

Harrisburg - PennDOT Secretary Barry J. Schoch announced Friday that Plenary Walsh Keystone Partners was selected for the department’s Rapid Bridge Replacement Project, a Public-Private Partnership (P3) to replace 558 bridges across the state.

The team, which included 11 Pennsylvania-based subcontractors in its proposal, must begin construction in summer 2015 and complete the replacements within 36 months. The commonwealth retains ownership of the bridges, but the team is responsible for maintaining each bridge for 25 years after its replacement.

“This initiative reflects Governor Corbett’s strong commitment to taking innovative steps to bring improvements to the state’s roads and bridges more quickly and at reasonable cost,” Schoch said. “This agreement helps Pennsylvania take a big step to cutting further into its backlog of structurally deficient bridges.”

The team’s $899 million proposal was selected based on scoring that considered cost, financial capability to carry out the project, background and experience in managing comparable projects, and understanding of the project. The project will cost an average of $65 million annually for the 28-year contract term.

The average cost for design, construction and maintenance per bridge in the project is $1.6 million. Through PennDOT’s standard process, the cost to design, construct and maintain a bridge for 28 years would be an average of more than $2 million.

“The goal for this project is not only finding cost savings, but also to minimize impact to the traveling public,” Schoch said. “This team has thoroughly detailed their traffic control plans and expects to finish construction eight months earlier than required.”

Plenary Walsh Keystone Partners will manage the bridges' design, construction and maintenance under the contract. The team is responsible for financing the effort and PennDOT will make performance-based payments based on the contractor’s adherence to the contract terms. PennDOT will be responsible for routine maintenance, such as snow plowing and debris removal.

The Rapid Bridge Replacement Project was approved by the state's P3 Board on Sept. 27, 2013.

Plenary Walsh Keystone Partners consist of the Plenary Group, The Walsh Group, Granite Construction Company and HDR Engineering. Walsh and HDR maintain offices in Pennsylvania.

The Pennsylvania subcontractors identified in the team’s proposal are: A.D. Marble & Company of Conshohocken, Montgomery County; M.A. Beech Corporation of Carnegie, Allegheny County; Carmen Paliotta Contracting of South Park Township, Allegheny County; Clearwater Construction Inc. of Mercer, Mercer County; Francis J. Palo Inc. of Clarion, Clarion County; Glenn O. Hawbaker Inc. of State College, Centre County; J.D. Eckman, Inc. of Atglen, Chester County; J.F. Shea Construction Inc. of Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland County; Larson Design Group of Williamsport, Lycoming County; Swank Construction Co. of New Kensington, Westmoreland County; and TRC Engineers, Inc. of Export; Westmoreland County. Schoch made the announcement at a news conference near the Spanglers Mill Road Bridge over the Yellow Breeches Creek in Cumberland County, just west of Harrisburg. The bridge is one of the 558 to be replaced under the Rapid Bridge Replacement program.

The list of Bridges included in this project within Schuylkill County are

  • PA 339 Bridge over Catawissa Creek in Zions Grove and Catawissa Creek Road Crossings
  • PA 924 Bridge south of Shenandoah over Kehly Run
  • SR 4016 Bridge over Mahantongo Creek in Klingerstown
  • SR 4036 Bridge near Trexler Run
  • SR 4039 Bridge over Mahantongo Creek near Haas

To see the bridges included in the initiative and to learn more about the Rapid Bridge Replacement Project and P3 in Pennsylvania, visit
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